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 Do you know your wing chun?
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bare knuckle


3 Posts

Posted - 11/02/2006 :  10:07:22  Show Profile Send bare knuckle a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Many say wing chun is a conceptual art. At a higher level this may be so... But what is to keep wing chun as wing chun and not turning into something else? The answer is within the Pai's tenets.

But just how many know the pai's tenets?????

Kew-Do



USA
920 Posts

Posted - 11/02/2006 :  23:18:06  Show Profile  Visit Kew-Do's Homepage Send Kew-Do a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Wing Chun AKA..Yong Chun Chuan- Principles:

The Pai's tenets are:
1.) Practicality
2.) Efficiency and
3.) Economy of movement.

This core philosophy becomes a useful guide to practitioners when modifying or refining the art. New techniques which do not conform to these principles are often discouraged and discarded.


Wing Chun - Practicality:

Wing Chun was designed purely for fighting rather than artistic or sport applications. As such, its techniques emphasise practicality and effectiveness over aesthetic or athletic value. Most strikes are fatal and target vulnerable areas of the body such as the throat, groin, eyes and lower torso.

Following this utilitarian approach, the names of Wing Chun techniques are purely descriptive. For example - palm-up hand (tan sau), wing arm (bong sau), slapping hand (pak sau). Wing Chun terminology is traditionally rendered in the Cantonese dialect of Chinese.


Wing Chun - Efficiency:

Wing Chun believes in using the least amount of required force in any fighting situation because it is a more efficient use of the body's energy. Wasted or unnecessary movement which does not produce a combat advantage is discouraged.

Wing Chun believes that small movements, properly timed and correctly positioned, can and should be used to defeat large movements. This is achieved through balance, body structure and relaxation. The famous Chinese "8 taels to move 1000 catties" (referring to an old Chinese measurement system) is appropriate here in describing how a small amount of force, precisely applied, can repel large attacks.

Strictly speaking, there are no blocks in Wing Chun because they are believed to be inefficient. It is more appropriate, from a Wing Chun perspective, to deflect incoming force (as opposed to meeting it head-on) and counter-attack at the same time. The practitioner uses parries to deflect the incoming strikes and offset the attacker. A parry usually requires a very small amount of energy when compared to harder block. A parry can be used to deflect the strike of the opponent and launch a counter-attack at the same time. Also there exits an idea to offset the striker's balance and attack vulnerable points.


Wing Chun - Economy of Movement:

Wing Chun believes that the shortest path between two points is a straight line. Thus, most Wing Chun movements are linear and initiated along an imaginary line of attack, or the centerline. The Wing Chun punch, for example, is delivered centrally from the practitioner's chest rather than diagonally from the shoulders in the first two forms. This helps teach the centerline concept. In the later forms, the punch is delivered diagonally from the shoulder to the centerline. This is because the distance is shorter than bringing the hand from the shoulder, to the center of the chest, and then down the centerline at the opponent. Also, as an expression of one's skill and experience, the punch is delivered from any point in space, directly to the point where the practitioner's centerline meets with the opponent.


Kew-Do


Give me a fish and I eat for today....Show me how to make "Sweet and Sour" Fish so that I can open a Chinese Restaurant...

Edited by - Kew-Do on 11/02/2006 23:19:07
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method man



United Kingdom
283 Posts

Posted - 11/03/2006 :  07:03:03  Show Profile Send method man a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Kew Do - spot on, your definition of Wing Chun is very good, in fact it should be read by all people coming to this part of the forum before they are allowed to participate .
However I would like to be cheeky and argue some points. while most hands in Wing chun are parries Jut, Tan, bong, guan, fak, biu, fuk. Jum sao is not a parry but a damaging/attacking block also low bong can be used in the same way. Lan is used to block movement?
On economy of motion when you control centreline but your opponents energy and intent is also their is it not economical to be somewhere else striking outside left or right, make your opponent belive their is a straight line where there is none while taking a curve-line?
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Kew-Do



USA
920 Posts

Posted - 11/03/2006 :  07:50:42  Show Profile  Visit Kew-Do's Homepage Send Kew-Do a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thank you for your insight M.M.

That is what is so neet about Wing Chun....

It has many different applications and theory based upon family and Sifu. While your family tree applies a techniques another family tree may have a different application and understanding than yours. {It's kind of like telling a story to one person, and they share the story to 20 other people....the story can change. I truly believe this is what has happened with Wing Chun Kuen.

My Hong Kong Wing Chun (Yip Man) has an applicability to what you refer to in your post, However, The Pao Fa Lien Wing Chun that I studied in the 80s creats a wedge into the oncoming force (In theory) almost like hitting a car come down the street at a 45 degree angle in the driver's side door which for you guys that live inUnited Kingdom is on the "WRONG Side" your right. It can also do this from top left right and bottom, It can be a jamming with the knee or the foot to defend against kicks. Both of out theorys still have the intercept and strike forward when free that a ll Win Chun systems embody which I think is very deceptive and the neet concept of the art. The Pan Nam Yong Chun differs in many aspects from both. Putting them all three together my Wing Chun has many applications however abides by the Tenets mentioned above.

Method Man, What is your family tree In W.C.K?

Kew-Do

Give me a fish and I eat for today....Show me how to make "Sweet and Sour" Fish so that I can open a Chinese Restaurant...
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method man



United Kingdom
283 Posts

Posted - 11/03/2006 :  10:58:32  Show Profile Send method man a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I think I covered it before, but I do Yip Man Wing Chun Kuen I have done both Yip Chun and Yip Ching variations of it and have seen most of the other important ones Wong shun leung etc. The difference between these is great. I also saw some foshan Wing Chun when I was in china, again only 2-3 generations different to what I practice but basically a different art in its own right. I have over the years had a chance to practice chi sao with other Wing chun schools in GB and China and everybody has their own little speciality which is always cool to discover (unless it hurts)
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